6 Ways to Make a Lasting Dent in Your Personal World

1. Stop Being Reasonable

“The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” ~ George Bernard Shaw

Success does not occur naturally. Yes, some form of “natural talent” may exist but talent is just a starting point. DO NOT be deceived by it.

Genius is much less about genetics and much more about mindset. Start believing new things about yourself. Change your perspective on your ability. Make everything a skill instead of a talent.

Lesson: The dedicated unreasonable man achieves the unthinkable.

2. Stop Avoiding your Fears

“What we resist persists. What we look at disappears.” ~ Neale Donald Walsch

When you avoid fear, you maintain and magnify it. Fear isn’t real. Fear isn’t what’s actually happening. It’s just your reaction to it.

Nothing rises indefinitely. Fear, if you face it, will soon begin to subside the more you expose yourself to it.

Lesson: The only way out is through.

3. Stop Pursuing Perfection

Perfection is not the art of getting things right but of procrastination.

The pursuit of perfection is standing between you and your goals. You only know when you do because action always brings clarity.

So don’t just consume knowledge, hoarding it for the perfect moment. Use what you’ve consumed. Create something with your knowledge. Execute. Execute. Execute.

Lesson: Execution trumps knowledge.

4. Stop waiting for Passion to give you Permission to Start

“Passion is not a trait that exists in advance. It comes with mastery and is cultivated over time.” ~ Cal Newport

Waiting for the stars to align and for passion to strike is a sure sign you’re a perfectionist and perfectionists never take action.

Passion green lights nothing and guarantees even less. When you wait for permission, you squander your most precious resource: time.

Lesson: “Don’t wait for passion to lead you somewhere you’re not. Start by bringing passion to the place where you are.” ~ John Ortberg

5. Build Habits not Goals

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” ~ Will Durant

Habits are foundational and goals are simply challenging.

Once the challenge is conquered we tend to move on and in short measure, cast any benefits accrued, to the wayside.

Decide what habits will improve the quality of your life and be deliberate, methodical and unreasonable in their pursuit.

Lesson: If you want to change just one day in your life, set a goal. If you want to change your whole life, build a habit.

6. Be Grateful

“The greedy person lives in a perpetual state of inadequacy.” ~ Charlie Ambler

Learn to craft your own definition of success. To actively focus on all the good things that you have in your life and receive with gratitude the high’s and low’s that are part of the human experience.

If for nothing else, but to compensate for the brains’ natural tendency to focus on threats, worries, and the negative aspects of life.

Lesson: Gratitude is essential for contentment.

Thanks for choosing to read this post! If this post resonates with you, show it some love by clicking the like button below so others can find it too.

Recognize

 

Advertisements

If You Are Going Through Hell Chances Are You’ve Been Playing With Fire

It’s a privilege to think that when things go wrong in our lives it is not because of our actions but because of some other cosmic force.

I’ve been writing for over two years now. I write mainly about personal development and self-improvement. Not because it’s an 11 billion dollar industry but because when I started paying attention to the world and how I was living in it I found some glaring inconsistencies between my actions and my thoughts.

When your actions start to make a liar out of your thoughts, it’s time for some deep introspection.

You know that quote that says “If you do what you love, you’ll never work a day in your life.” That’s not my experience.

When you love what you do there’s a whole lot of work and then some because you’re invested in the outcome and subsequent impact. There’s no cutting corners or passing the buck.

Maybe the quote is more about how you feel about the work you’re doing rather than the work itself.

I love what I am currently working on. It makes me as giddy as a kid on Christmas morning. Last week, I chose to allow this excitement to interrupt my usual sleep routine on a couple of days. Big mistake.

There is no better you without sleep.

My reward for playing fast and loose with the great benefits of sleep was a hellish week.

Amongst other things, sleep makes you resilient. Since my resilience tanks were running on near empty, when life did what life is designed to do – interrupt – I reacted not as my old self would have but not as my better self either.

Resilience has long been confused with something you build by persevering and enduring. Turns out it’s something you build by “trying really hard, then stopping, recovering, and then trying again” writes Shawn Achor and Michelle Gielan in an HBR article titled Resilience Is About How You Recharge, Not How You Endure.

You need that resilience when facing individuals or events that have the potential to set you off course.

Events have no meaning until meaning is applied to them. Therefore your perception of an event matters more than the event itself. When you are sleep deprived though, everything that goes wrong seems like a colossal clusterfuck. You perceive hell everywhere you look and turn. The bigger you make negative events seem the more difficult it is to get over them.

You can’t pour from an empty cup. Cliché but true.

When you’re sleep deprived, everything calls for extra. You need extra energy to work, to be creative and just to merely exist. You need extra effort to work out. You need extra discipline to eat right. Your extra is coming from empty so you go from doing to not doing. Activity to inactivity.

Inactivity, when there should be activity has a steep price tag.

I was going through hell but it was entirely my own doing. I had been playing with fire.

How Much Sleep Do You Need

How much sleep do you need? That’s not for me to tell you. There’s what science says and there’s what your body says it needs. What your body needs should win every time.

You must figure it out for yourself. Do not attempt to copy the sleep schedule of that person you think is doing so well in life on only three hours of sleep. To each his own. You need as much sleep as you need.

Dr. Christopher Winter offers the following tips to help you figure out how much you sleep you need.

  • How long does it take you to fall asleep? We usually consider a normal sleep latency (the time it takes to fall asleep) to be about 15-20 minutes. If you are asleep before your head hits the pillow, you might not be sleeping enough. If it takes you an hour or more to fall asleep, you might be trying to sleep too much.
  • Do you awaken during the night? There are many serious sleep conditions that can disrupt sleep, but trying to sleep too much can be equally problematic to sleep continuity.
  • Do you frequently wake up before your alarm? Even if you go back to sleep, it might be your brain’s way of telling you that it’s gotten what it needs in terms of sleep. Try starting your day when you first wake up instead of continuing to snooze.
  • Finally, and most importantly, how do you feel during the day? Are you sleepy? Try to ignore feelings of fatigue or low body energy and instead focus on how likely are you to fall asleep sitting and reading or working after lunch. If you feel driven to sleep, you might need more sleep. If not, your sleep might be perfect, even if you are only sleeping seven hours.

“Sleep deprivation is not a badge of honor. Forgoing sleep is like borrowing from a loan shark. Sure you get those extra hours right now to cover for your overly-optimistic estimation, but at what price? The shark will be back, and if you can’t pay, he’ll break your creativity, morale, and good-mannered nature as virtue twigs.” ~ David Heinemeier Hansson (DHH)

Thanks for reading! If this post resonated with you be sure to click the like button below. Also, feel free to share this post.

Recognize

 

725,000 Pounds per Square Inch

It takes 725,000 pounds per square inch of pressure to create a diamond.

At the starting line, we are all chunks of coal. We all have the potential to turn into diamonds.

However, in order to do that we must be willing to work and subject ourselves to a force that resists comfort, challenges preconceived notions and breaks us from the inside out.

All our difficulties, problems and challenges, represent that force.

That force never arrives alone. It is always accompanied by choice. The choice to see it as burdensome, meaningless and purposeless, or to view it as an opportunity. An opportunity to learn, grow, improve or adjust. An opportunity, if taken, that undoutedbly leaves us stronger than we were before.

Every time you go out and do something tough. Every time you withstand the force meant to break you. Every time you view your problems as opportunities and say “what can I learn from this situation.” Your good gets exposed to great. If you stay the course, your great gets exposed to greater still.

“Diamonds are nothing more than chunks of coal that stuck to their jobs.” ―Malcolm Forbes

Your problems are opportunities designed to get you to be who you are destined to be. The bigger the problem, the greater the opportunity.

Your life is a duplication of your consciousness. Don’t sentence yourself to a lifetime of mediocrity, fear and self-doubt. Recondition your thinking. Empower your problems to build you up and prepare you for what comes next.

Thanks for reading! If this post resonated with you be sure to click the like button below. Also, feel free to share this post.

Recognize

 

An Unacceptable Excuse

“I don’t know how” is a crappy, unacceptable excuse.

When you say you don’t know how to do something, what you’re actually saying is you’re not determined enough and lack the discipline to learn how. You’re also saying you have low self-esteem and don’t believe that you can learn how to do it.

Is this what you mean to say?

Other Excuses that Mean the Same Thing as “I don’t know how”

  1. ‘I don’t have the resources’
  2. ‘I don’t have the skills’
  3. ‘I don’t know enough’
  4. ‘I’ve never done it before’
  5. ‘It won’t make a difference’

“Every Next Level of Your Life will Demand a Different You”

Nobody is born knowing how. We all have to learn how to do anything.

Every next level of your life will demand a different you. That different you will require reinforcement that may or may not be in your current skill set.

“I don’t know how” is, therefore, an excuse you simply cannot afford to make. It denies your potential and holds you back. Not to mention, it steals your dreams right from under you.

What They Can’t Teach You in School

Robert Maynard Hutchins said.“The objective of education is to prepare the young to educate themselves throughout their lives.

You should not and cannot depend on a formal education to teach you everything you need to know. Why? The world is ever changing. The rules of success are not fixed. Technology is evolving faster than ever.

You are also evolving. What you may have thought is your life’s path then, may no longer hold any allure for you now. That is fine. You are allowed to change your mind.

Call To Action 

“I don’t know how” is simply the excuse you’re making to avoid having to take action.

John Locke said that “All wealth is the product of labor.” 

However you define wealth, none of it will ever be handed to you. You must work for it. If you work a little you get a little. If you work a lot, you get a lot.

You are the author and editor of your destiny. If you don’t know how, now is not the time for excuses. No one is coming to show you how so go figure it out.

Figure out what you do know and what you don’t know and then go in search of how to fill the gap. It’s how all those who’ve been there and done that, did it. They are no more special than you.

“At the end of the day, let there be no excuses, no explanations, no regrets.” ~ Steve Maraboli

Thanks for reading! If this post resonates with you be sure to click the like button below. Feel free to also share it so others may benefit from it too.

Recognize

How To Spot Amateur Hour

“Professionalism is a frame of mind, not a paycheck.” ~ Cecil Castle

Amateurs work from the outside in. They want to be noticed and therefore seek immediate gratification. Professionals work from the inside out. They want to influence and impact so they focus on building a legacy.

Amateurs are always hunting for motivation and inspiration to create action. Professionals are powered by their habits.

Amateurs are imbued with a permanent sense of haste. Professionals are masters of the long game.

Amateurs want to arrive so they practice as much as they have to. Professionals want to progress so they never stop practicing.

Amateurs focus on how good they are. Professionals are driven by how good they want to be and are always looking for a chance to get better.

Amateurs are ruled by the fear of failure and run from it at every chance. Professionals are empowered by failure and always choose to face it head on.

Amateurs live by default and major in minor things. Professionals are deliberate and intentional and never get caught up in the thick of thin things.

Amateurs put a clock on learning. Professionals are enrolled in lifelong learning.

Amateurs address the urgent. Professionals focus on the important.

Amateurs wait to have time and therefore let life set the pace and prioritize their schedule. Professionals make time are therefore ruthless with their time and schedule their priorities.

Amateurs have a casual relationship with the rules. Professionals have an intimate relationship with the rules. They know which rules to break and they know when and why to break them.

Amateurs opt to quit when the work gets hard. Professionals take a break when the going gets tough.

Amateurs know how to get things done. Professionals know why a thing should be done. How gets things done. Why gets the right things done.

Amateurs relive the past. Professionals move on for the know what got them here will not get them where they must go.

Amateurs act big to achieve small things. Professionals act small to achieve big things.

Amateurs act from a state of convenience. Professionals show up each and every time. Whether it’s convenient or not.

Amateurs underestimate the power of rest. Professionals acknowledge that without rest they are shortchanging themselves so they schedule it.

Amateurs have a plan for when things go right and are running smoothly. Professionals have a plan for when things go wrong.

Amateurs get ready. Professionals stay ready.

Professionalism is a state of mind. It does not require a title, a suit or a tie. It has less to do with how you behave in front of an audience of many and more to do with your performance in front of an audience of one – yourself.

 

Recognize

Thanks for reading! If this post resonated with you be sure to click the like button below. Also, feel free to share this post.

 

 

12 Instances Where Worrying Should Be The Last Thing On Your Mind

“Worry does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, it empties today of its strength.” ~ Corrie ten Boom

1. Do not worry about comparing your thing to their thing. A habit of external comparison is rewarded with envy. Envy will rob you of the creative energy required to make your thing great.

2. Do not worry about whether things will get easier. They don’t. The higher you go and the further you reach you’ll discover that difficulty is built in. However, it is not there to disqualify but to qualify. To help you understand the level of commitment and sacrifice required to get through. Add commitment and sacrifice to intentional practice and you will get stronger and better with each passing day.

3. Do not worry about the past or about the future. Said Roy T. Bennett, “No amount of regretting can change the past, and no amount of worrying can change the future.” Orient yourself to the present. It is the only moment you have. However, it is the only moment you need.

4. Do not worry about being fully ready for the next step. No one ever is. Take the step and jump. Grow wings on the way down. If you get knocked around remember. Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue and the cracks are where the light comes through.

5. Do not worry about the people who choose to leave. People come into your life for a reason, a season, or a lifetime. Reasons change. Seasons change. You change. Appreciate what was and make room for what is to come.

6. Do not worry about getting acknowledgment for your work. Everything you create has its own voice. Focus on value and in time your work will speak for itself and be sort out on its own merit.

7. Don’t worry about what they say when you ask for what you need. People do not come equipped to read the minds of others. Many want to help. They just don’t how. You’re the only one who can tell them. You’re the only one who knows exactly what you need.

8. Don’t worry about rejection. Rejection sucks. However,  rejection is more ‘not yet’ than ‘never’. Don’t let rejection knock you out of the race and be where your story ends.

9. Don’t worry about failure. It’s only permanent if you choose not to get up. Be motivated by the words of Napoleon Hill. “Most great people have attained their greatest success one step beyond their greatest failure.”

10. Do not worry about going after what you want. Nothing comes to us except death. It is the only achievement that is pre-assigned.  Everything else we must go out in search of.

11. Do not worry about saying no to what others want for you and pursuing your own dream. Said Richard Koch, “Most of our failures are in races for which others enter us. Most of our success comes from races we ourselves want to enter.”

12. Do not worry about the goal. Set it and forget it. If the goal was well chosen, the only thing that requires your focus and energy is the process. Build the habits required for the process and the goal will be accomplished.

Worrying is not an action but a reaction. Figure out what it is that you are reacting to and deal with it.

“Remember, the moment you accept total responsibility for everything in your life is the moment you claim the power to change anything in your life.” ~ Hal Elrod.Recognize

Thanks for reading! If this post resonated with you be sure to click the like button below. Also, feel free to share this post.

 

Arm Yourself for Monday

The start does not dictate the finish. It does, however, dictate the trajectory. Monday is the first day of the week. Here’s how to optimize the trajectory that stems from it.

1. Be Punctual 

“Promptitude is not only a duty, but is also a part of good manners; it is favorable to fortune, reputation, influence, and usefulness; a little attention and energy will form the habit, so as to make it easy and delightful.” ~ Charles Simmons

Do not allow yourself to be late on Monday. If you’re late on Monday chances are more likely that you will be late the rest of the week.

Set your alarm to wake you up and set your alarm to give you a 15-minute countdown to when you must leave the house so as to be on time.

2. At Work Prepare to win Monday on Friday

“Why not seize the pleasure at once? — How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation!” ~ Jane Austen

If you work a Monday to Friday schedule make sure that before you leave the office on Friday that you have completed all the weekly tasks especially those that can add to the stress of Monday.

Also, check your calendar for the coming week so that you know what you need to prepare for. Surprises are for amateurs.

3. At Home Prepare to win Monday on Sunday

“Take time to deliberate; but when the time for action arrives, stop thinking and go in.” ~ Andrew Jackson

Thinking takes time. There are thoughts that push us forward and there are those that keep us in a holding pattern consuming valuable irreplaceable seconds. Minimize the latter to set Monday on a winning trajectory.

Do this by:

Figuring out what you’re going to wear on Monday and setting it aside. Setting it aside is crucial because where you think it is might end up being a false memory that slows you down. There’s an extra bonus for planning for the entire week.

Figuring out what you’re having for breakfast on Monday morning and setting it out.

Putting your packed lunch together.

4. Go to Bed Early

“Sleep is the golden chain that ties health and our bodies together.” ~ Thomas Dekker

Human beings are powered from the inside out. Sleep revitalizes us physically, emotionally and mentally.

Go to bed early enough so that you wake up feeling rested and full of energy to set Monday off on the right course.

5. Load up on Inspiration and Gratitude

“For a man to achieve all that is demanded of him he must regard himself as greater than he is.” ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Inspiration is borrowed courage. Borrowed courage is still courage. When the body is willing but the mind is weak, inspiration plugs the holes and keeps you moving.

“If the only prayer you say in your life is ‘thank you,’ that would suffice.” – Meister Eckhart

Gratitude makes everything enough via contentment and not complacency. It creates positivity and positivity always propels.

Both inspiration and gratitude should be a daily practice. If you are new to the practice, however, commit to doing it at least every Monday morning and build from there.

6. Do not Procrastinate

“If it’s your job to eat a frog, it’s best to do it first thing in the morning. And If it’s your job to eat two frogs, it’s best to eat the biggest one first.” ~  Mark Twain

The number one way to set Monday off on a losing trajectory is to procrastinate. To take the unpleasant, difficult or boring yet important tasks (frogs) and keep rolling them down the week. You must fight this temptation with every single fiber of your being.

Tether your frogs to the first slot in the morning and get it over and done with. If you have more than one frog to address, prioritize but get them done. No exceptions.

Recognize

Thanks for reading! If this post resonated with you be sure to click the like button below. Also, feel free to share this post.

The Difference between Playing to Win & Playing Not to Lose

Playing to win and playing not to lose are only similar in the eyes of an amateur.

1

… Pushing beyond the edge of comfort.

… Focusing on what inspires you.

… Focusing on the gains. What you do want.

… Focusing on your efforts. What you do.

… Focusing on the future. Where you want to be. Letting it drive you.

… Embracing risk.

… Finding new ways to say yes

… Being proactive. Owning the decision.

… Maintaining a competitive edge.

… Subjective well-being. Controlling the mind.

… Asking continuous improvement questions.

… Creating the fit.

… Being accountable.

… Believing in yourself to do what is needed.

… Making time to do.

… Assigning the environment a ‘challenge’ label.

… Mentality – Own the day.

2

… Maintaining the status quo.

… Preserving the comfort zone.

… Playing it safe.

… Protecting what you already have.

… Focusing on the present. Where you are. Letting it stop you.

… Missing opportunities.

… Finding new ways to say no.

… Not finishing what you start.

… Focusing on outcomes. What you don’t want.

… Being reactive.

… Letting them decide.

… Creative destruction. The mind controls you.

… Making self-serving statements.

…. Manipulating the fit.

… Finding a scapegoat.

… Believing in others to let you do what is needed.

… Having time to do.

… Assigning the environment a ‘threat’ label.

… Mentality – Just get through the day.

Are you playing to win or are you playing not to lose?

Recognize

Thanks for reading! If this post resonated with you be sure to click the like button below. Also, feel free to share this post.

 

 

4 Habits that Will Silence Your Heartless Inner Critic

Hands down, no one, will ever be able to criticize you more than you criticize yourself. This is not always a compliment.

The Wall Street Journal reported that “Unrelenting self-criticism often goes hand in hand with depression and anxiety, and it may even predict depression.”

Psychologist and author Golan Shahar, in his book titled Erosion: The Psychopathology of Self-Criticism, says that “self-criticism is a trait that has been shown to lead to numerous forms of psychopathology: depression, anxiety, eating disorders, bipolar disorder symptoms. It can lead to psychosomatic symptoms whereby the mental struggles manifest in physical problems, such a chronic fatigue and pain; and under the weight of the mounting mental health burden, some take their own lives.”

It can lead to psychosomatic symptoms whereby the mental struggles manifest in physical problems, such a chronic fatigue and pain; and under the weight of the mounting mental health burden, some take their own lives.”

The society which we live in is also not helping matters. It’s propagating a self-destructive message. A message that takes root early in life. That being hard on ourselves and being ashamed of our actions gets results. This has given birth to the mentality that unsubstantiated deflating self-criticism is the preferred path to success.

The goal is not to get rid of self-critique. Self-criticism is a powerful self-improvement and personal development tool. Its successful application lies in making the critique constructive.

Following are four habits guaranteed to silence your heartless inner critic and make self-criticism constructive.

1. Practice Self-Compassion

Self-compassion is a habit that you must give yourself permission to indulge in. It is not a selfish act. Self-compassion creates within you, a judgment-free zone. The whole world is already judging you plenty. You do not need to join them. They are giving out enough to go around and then some.

In a judgment-free zone, you develop the confidence to take risks and try new things. You learn not punish your future for the mistakes of your past or hold the future hostage with the events of the present.

To develop your self-compassion, embrace your humanity. Be kind to yourself. Treat yourself like you’d treat your best friend. Exercise active mindfulness and power thinking.

Active mindfulness is reveling in the present without wishing for days gone by or hastening the arrival of future days. Future days you think hold more pleasure. Power thinking is recognizing and understanding that something is neutral until you assign it meaning.

Building and practicing self-compassion is the essence of self-love and as Rupi Kaur said, “How you love yourself is how you teach others to love you.” 

2. Want What You’ve Got

In this age of hyper-consumerism and instant gratification, wanting what you’ve got is radical thinking. When you focus on what you don’t have, you give your inner critic carte blanche to whittle away self-worth.

Be grateful for what you do have. Be grateful for where you are in life. Celebrate all your achievements especially the small ones that are often overlooked. If you can’t appreciate what you have, you will not appreciate fully what is to come. Thereby guaranteeing your heartless inner critic an all-access pass to your life.

3. Focus on what You have the Power to Change

Your destructive inner critic does not discriminate. It criticizes both behaviors and attributes alike. Constructive self-criticism requires you to focus only on your habits.

Behavior is built by habit. You have complete control over your habits. You can change any that do not find to your liking.

Attributes, on the other hand, are completely out of your control. You get what you get. Complaining about them precludes you to the fact that they have nothing to do with how great you can become.

In the pursuit of success, the issue is never time. It’s what to do with the time we’ve got. Learning to play the hand you were dealt in that regard gives you a running head start. While others are complaining about their height and their ears, you’re plotting how to turn your first million into a second.

As Jim Collins said, “Greatness is not a function of circumstance. Greatness, as it turns out, is largely a matter of conscious choice.” 

4. Create a schedule for your goals and not a deadline

Christine Comaford writes that humans crave “safety, belonging, and mattering… Mattering means each of us contributes individually in a unique way.”

To this end we set goals. To those goals, we attach deadlines. When we fail to meet our deadlines, we proceed to wallow in the ensuing negativity. The feelings created in that cesspool are premium fodder for your heartless inner critic.

Try something different. Instead of attaching deadlines to your important goals, set a schedule. Schedules enable you to progress consistently towards your goal. With each step of your advancement, your feelings of accomplishment will effectively silence your inner critic.

Life doesn’t wait. Opportunity doesn’t wait. Goals help you get ready. Schedules keep you ready. What does this look like in practice?

It looks like Lebron James. 3 time NBA championship winner. 4 time NBA Most Valuable Player. 3 time NBA Finals MVP Award winner. Who whilst on vacation, can be found in the gym.

Screen Shot 2016-07-14 at 8.40.42 PM

“The critical voices in our own heads are far more vicious than what we might hear from the outside. Our “inside critics” have intimate knowledge of us and can zero in on our weakest spots.

You might be told by the critics that you’re too fat, too old, too young, not intelligent enough, a quitter, not logical, prone to try too many things…
It’s all balderdash!

Some elements of these may be true, and it’s completely up to you how they affect you. Inside critics are really just trying to protect you. You can:

Learn to dialogue with them. Give them new jobs. Turn them into allies.
You can also dismantle/exterminate them.”
~ S.A.R.K., Creative Companion: How to Free Your Creative Spirit

Recognize

Thanks for reading! If this post resonated with you be sure to click the like button below. Also, feel free to share this post.

 

A 166 Second Video That Will Make You Rethink Your Morning Narrative

Jeff Goins says we need inspiration to live. He says inspiration provides encouragement to do the job that we’ve been given to do.

Scott Barry Kaufman in an article titled Why Inspiration Matters says that “Inspiration awakens us to new possibilities by allowing us to transcend our ordinary experiences and limitations. Inspiration propels a person from apathy to possibility, and transforms the way we perceive our own capabilities.”

Inspiration is important. However, it is not something you should go in search of. Not because it does not exist, but because it must find you in the throes of full-fledged action. As Pablo Picasso said, “Inspiration exists, but it has to find us working.”

That being said though, please don’t beat yourself up if you find yourself in need of an extra push from time to time. Inspiration can keep you going when the work threatens to overwhelm.

When I find myself in need of encouragement, I gravitate towards inspiration of the direct, unapologetic and hard-hitting variety. Inspiration that shines a spotlight on my deepest darkest excuses. Giving them absolutely no place to hide.

“The truth will set you free, but first it will piss you off.” ~ Joe Klaas

I thrive best under constant and firm reminders that I alone possess the keys to make the future exactly as I would like it to be. Sugar coating is banned from my inspirational sessions and reserved for bakery treats.

If you are like me in this regard then you will derive great inspirational actionable pleasure from Complainers by Rudy Francisco.

Complainers by Rudy Francisco

If you’ve watched this video, watch it again. Inspiration, like bathing, doesn’t take on the first trial. When it does, the results are never permanent. Hence the recommendation to engage with both repeatedly. Especially when it has to do with the topic addressed in the video.

Memento mori is a Latin phrase meaning ‘remember you must die’. Death is guaranteed to all but you are not dead yet.

When you wake up each morning, put your lamenting and whining on hold. When you’re tempted to succumb to complaining never forget that it doesn’t matter if the glass is half full or half empty. There’s water in the cup.

Drink it, stop complaining and ACT AS IF YOU ARE ALIVE!

 

Recognize

Thanks for reading! If this post resonated with you be sure to click the like button below. Also, feel free to share this post.

Image Credit: Hand image created by Ijeab – Freepik.com